Response to marriage and love by emma goldman essay

The popular notion about marriage and love is that they are synonymous, that they spring from the same motives, and cover the same human needs. Like most popular notions this also rests not on actual facts, but on superstition.

Response to marriage and love by emma goldman essay

Mother Earth Publishing Association, Like most popular notions this also rests not on actual facts, but on superstition.

Emma Goldman - Wikipedia

Marriage and love have nothing in common; they are as far apart as the poles; are, in fact, antagonistic to each other. No doubt some marriages have been the result of love. Not, however, because love could assert itself only in marriage; much rather is it because few people can completely outgrow a convention.

There are to-day large numbers of men and women to whom marriage is naught but a farce, but who submit to it for the sake of public opinion.

Response to marriage and love by emma goldman essay

At any rate, while it is true that some marriages are based on love, and while it is equally true that in some cases love continues in married life, I maintain that it does so regardless of marriage, and not because of it. On the other hand, it is utterly false that love results from marriage.

On rare occasions one does hear of a miraculous case of a married couple falling in love after marriage, but on close examination it will be found that it is a mere adjustment to the inevitable.

Certainly the growing-used to each other is far away from the spontaneity, the intensity, and beauty of love, without which the intimacy of marriage must prove degrading to both the woman and the man. Marriage is primarily an economic arrangement, an insurance pact. It differs from the ordinary life insurance agreement only in that it is more binding, more exacting.

Its returns are insignificantly small compared with the investments. In taking out an insurance policy one pays for it in dollars and cents, always at liberty to discontinue payments. If, how ever, woman's premium is a husband, she pays for it with her name, her privacy, her self-respect, her very life, "until death doth part.

Man, too, pays his toll, but as his sphere is wider, marriage does not limit him as much as woman. He feels his chains more in an economic sense. Thus Dante's motto over Inferno applies with equal force to marriage: One has but to glance over the statistics of divorce to realize how bitter a failure marriage really is.

Nor will the stereotyped Philistine argument that the laxity of divorce laws and the growing looseness of woman account for the fact that: Added to these startling figures is a vast amount of material, dramatic and literary, further elucidating this subject.

Robert Herrick, in Together; Pinero, in Mid-Channel; Eugene Walter, in Paid in Full, and scores of other writers are discussing the barrenness, the monotony, the sordidness, the inadequacy of marriage as a factor for harmony and understanding.

The thoughtful social student will not content himself with the popular superficial excuse for this phenomenon. He will have to dig down deeper into the very life of the sexes to know why marriage proves so disastrous. Edward Carpenter says that behind every marriage stands the life-long environment of the two sexes; an environment so different from each other that man and woman must remain strangers.

Separated by an insurmountable wall of superstition, custom, and habit, marriage has not the potentiality of developing knowledge of, and respect for, each other, without which every union is doomed to failure. Henrik Ibsen, the hater of all social shams, was probably the first to realize this great truth.

Nora leaves her husband, notas the stupid critic would have itbecause she is tired of her responsibilities or feels the need of woman's rights, but because she has come to know that for eight years she had lived with a stranger and borne him children. Can there be any thing more humiliating, more degrading than a life long proximity between two strangers?

No need for the woman to know anything of the man, save his income.

Response to “Marriage and Love” by Emma Goldman Essay Sample

As to the knowledge of the womanwhat is there to know except that she has a pleasing appearance? We have not yet outgrown the theologic myth that woman has no soul, that she is a mere appendix to man, made out of his rib just for the convenience of the gentleman who was so strong that he was afraid of his own shadow.

Perchance the poor quality of the material whence woman comes is responsible for her inferiority. At any rate, woman has no soulwhat is there to know about her?

Besides, the less soul a woman has the greater her asset as a wife, the more readily will she absorb herself in her husband.

It is this slavish acquiescence to man's superiority that has kept the marriage institution seemingly intact for so long a period. Now that woman is coming into her own, now that she is actually growing aware of herself as a being outside of the master's grace, the sacred institution of marriage is gradually being undermined, and no amount of sentimental lamentation can stay it.

From infancy, almost, the average girl is told that marriage is her ultimate goal; therefore her training and education must be directed towards that end.Yahoo Lifestyle is your source for style, beauty, and wellness, including health, inspiring stories, and the latest fashion trends. The Hollywood Reporter is your source for breaking news about Hollywood and entertainment, including movies, TV, reviews and industry blogs.

Free Emma Goldman papers, essays, and research papers The response given by Emma Donoghue’s novel Room, simply states, “If you’ve got a village. In the essay below I will be discussing how the author, Jane Austen, presents the themes of love and marriage in the novel Emma.

The novel Emma is about a young woman who is interested in. Marriage and Love. American University of Beirut Spring - Response to "Marriage and Love" by Emma Goldman "Marriage and Love", an article by Emma Goldman tackles the issue of marriage and the notion of free grupobittia.comn argues that "love" and "marriage" are two concepts that simply can't go grupobittia.com states that love has the ability to liberate its subject, .

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Sep 26,  · Read the full text here: grupobittia.com Emma Goldman () was an anarchist political theorist, activist, and writer.

Her work. Marriage and Love Source: Emma Goldman’s Anarchism and Other Essays. THE popular notion about marriage and love is that they are synonymous, that they spring from the same motives, and cover the same human needs.

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