The definition of conformity and its influence

Contact Author Introduction Social psychology looks at how people influence and are influenced by others. How the members of a group influence an individual is an important part of social psychology research. In summary, it pertains to any changes in the way an individual acts, thinks, or behaves as a result of interaction with another person or group of people.

The definition of conformity and its influence

Saul McLeodpublishedupdated Conformity is a type of social influence involving a change in belief or behavior in order to fit in with a group. Group pressure may take different forms, for example bullying, persuasion, teasing, criticism, etc. Conformity is also known as majority influence or group pressure.

Jenness was the first psychologist to study conformity. His experiment was an ambiguous situation involving a glass bottle filled with beans.

Explanations of Conformity

He asked participants individually to estimate how many beans the bottle contained. Jenness then put the group in a room with the bottle, and asked them to provide a group estimate through discussion.

Participants were then asked to estimate the number on their own again to find whether their initial estimates had altered based on the influence of the majority. Jenness then interviewed the participants individually again, and asked if they would like to change their original estimates, or stay with the group's estimate.

Almost all changed their individual guesses to be closer to the group estimate. However, perhaps the most famous conformity experiment was by Solomon Asch and his line judgment experiment. Types of Conformity Kelman distinguished between three different types of conformity: Compliance or group acceptance This occurs 'when an individual accepts influence because he hopes to achieve a favourable reaction from another person or group.

He adopts the induced behavior because In other words, conforming to the majority publiclyin spite of not really agreeing with them privately. Compliance stops when there are no group pressures to conform, and is therefore a temporary behavior change.

Internalisation genuine acceptance of group norms This occurs 'when an individual accepts influence because the content of the induced behavior - the ideas and actions of which it is composed - is intrinsically rewarding. He adopts the induced behavior because it is congruent [consistent] with his value system' Kelman,p.

Internalisation always involves public and private conformity. A person publicly changes their behavior to fit in with the group, while also agreeing with them privately.

This means the change in behavior is permanent. This is most likely to occur when the majority have greater knowledge, and members of the minority have little knowledge to challenge the majority position. Identification or group membership This occurs 'when an individual accepts influence because he wants to establish or maintain a satisfying self-defining relationship to another person or group' Kelman,p.

Individuals conform to the expectations of a social role, e. It is similar to compliance as there does not have to be a change in private opinion. A good example is Zimbardo's Prison Study.

Man identified an additional type of conformity: It is similar to normative influence, but is motivated by the need for social rewards rather than the threat of rejection, i.· Conformity focuses upon the ways in which other people exert their influence upon us in such a way that we go along with them.

For example some teenagers may go along with what their friends do when they themselves would have preferred to have gone elsewhere. Conformity is a type of social influence involving a change in belief or behavior in order to fit in with a group.

This change is in response to real (involving the physical presence of others) or imagined (involving the pressure of social norms / Author: Saul Mcleod. Mar 24,  · Conformity and obedience are central concepts to social influence and the studies discussed in this paper gave both classical as well as contemporary study examples on how group influences could get individual to do things that they might not otherwise grupobittia.coms: 2.

Both conformity and anti-conformity have a place in humanity as an instrument for survival, to move people forward, if they are not taken too far. But the first definition of Non Conformity is probably what all humans should aim for, if even as a distant goal, Independence of behavior.

Conformity is the act of matching attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors to group norms. Norms are implicit, specific rules, shared by a group of individuals, that guide their interactions with others. This tendency to conform occurs in small groups and/or society as a whole, and may result from subtle unconscious influences, or direct and overt social pressure.

The definition of conformity and its influence

Conformity is a type of social influence involving a change in belief or behavior in order to fit in with a group. This change is in response to real (involving the physical presence of others) or imagined (involving the pressure of social norms / expectations) group grupobittia.com: Saul Mcleod.

What are the four different types of conformity in psychology? | grupobittia.com